Freeze, Freeze & Refreeze

re·freeze

ˌrēˈfrēz/

verb 1. make or become frozen again.

black ice This image is from an actual property situation used with permission that other building owners and property managers need to be watching for at thier commercial properties. The picture is showing water coming from the rooftops due to roof thaw and water coming down through the drains and spilling out onto pedestrian walking areas and refreezing. Keep in mind that this will potentially occur repeatedly long after storms have passed and each night as temps drop, create new problems for the morning commute.

A pedestrian could be walking by and not notice this morning surprise and walk across that ice and slip and fall. To prevent this from happening, crews have to put heavy salt or deicer on the ice to melt it and then remove the ice. Treatments will probably take multiple trips back to check on it the drainage areas and scrape with a heavy duty steel shovel or ice scraper tool to break the ice up after it is bonded to the pavement.

When the temperature gets warm enough, the ice will melt on its own (some – not all) and then water will run across the sidewalk. Later that evening, when the sun goes down and if the temperature drops, crews will need to look again. Every night, ice may freeze across the sidewalk until all snow or ice is melted off the roof of the building.

Lots of slip and falls happen from these types of scenarios but remember, its better to keep treating and checking any time temps are below freezing following the storm as these tems can cause thick ice and black ice to form unexpectedly.

To learn more or consult with one of our Certified Snow Professionals, contact us today and we can help!

DISCLAIMER: Information contained in this Website and blog is intended for informational purposes only and do not necessarily reflect the direct opinions, views or practices of Swenson Consulting or its consultants. The individuals who maintain this blog work for Swenson Consulting. The information, comments and links posted on this blog do not constitute legal advice. No attorney-client relationship has been or will be formed by any communication(s) to, from or with the blog and/or the blogger. All decisions relating to the content of the website blog belong to the blogger and management company responsible for the blog for the purpose of aggregating relative industry specific information related to snow removal.